Posts Tagged ‘rip off’

Fixing Prices and Everything Else

February 11, 2010

Planned obsolescence as an industry standard is price fixing. Its the legal, hidden equivalent to retailers jacking their prices in unison. Purchases: remember its not just the price, but how much you’re getting. Take something like dish soap. The water and container aren’t of any use to you, so lets assume when you buy a container of dish soap you are really just after a quantity of soap ingredients. (more…)

Making Planned Obsolescence Illegal

December 26, 2008


Ever wonder how the package knows exactly when your light bulb will burn out? Annoyed that yet another cellphone battery has gone dead and replacements are not available? Amazed at the precision with which manufacturers are able to make products that last exactly 2 weeks longer than their warranties? (more…)

Throw out perfectly good goods

December 8, 2008


“Change your TV, change your life”- an actual slogan. I heard it last night. I’d also like to note, before i continue, the commercials where a woman throws her perfectly good washing machine into a pool so she will need to buy a new “red” one- to enrich her life. Also the commercial where the couple throws their phones into a lake (more…)

The Alkaline Battery Hoax

December 5, 2008


Here’s a good question. Children obviously get a hold of batteries since they run so many toys. According to the battery makers, these things “may explode or leak”. If we were giving something this dangerous to children wouldn’t it need CSA, or ASA approval or something? Batteries don’t need the approval of a safety organization because they do not contain anything dangerous.

Repeatedly disposing of everyday alkaline batteries is completely unnecessary. Its a perfect example of misleading the public in the interests of profit. (more…)

Gas, A Good One

November 20, 2008

Here’s a good trick. Price of oil has potential to go up; gas prices immediately go up by a larger percentage. . . but. . . .oil prices go down in reality, gas prices very slowly and reluctantly go down by a smaller percentage. (more…)